Full Body Passive Range of Motion Exercises for Quadriplegics

Full Body Passive Range of Motion Exercises for Quadriplegics

Passive range of motion exercises for quadriplegics are extremely effective.

They help prevent and treat spasticity, so you don’t have to worry about random spasms or uncomfortable stiffness.

What Are Passive Range of Motion Exercises for Quadriplegics?

Let’s break it down.

Exercises are passive when you don’t have to exert effort to do them. Typically, someone else (like a physical therapist or caregiver) will move your paralyzed limbs for you.

Range of motion is the potential for movement. It’s how far and in which directions your joints can naturally move.

Quadriplegia (also known as tetraplegia) is when you injure the cervical region of your spine, so both your upper and lower body experience some form of paralysis.

Can All Quadriplegics Benefit From Passive Range of Motion Exercises?

there are lots of benefits to practice passive ROM exercises after spinal cord injury

Absolutely! Both complete and incomplete spinal cord injury patients can benefit from passive range of motion exercises.

Without paralysis, you’d be moving your joints to their full range of motion regularly without even thinking about it.

However, with quadriplegia, you have to be mindful about your body movements and make sure that your joints are being moved to their full potential.

Passive range of motion exercises will help quadriplegics have better blood flow, flexibility, and reduce pain after spinal cord injury.

Passive Range of Motion Exercises for Quadriplegics

passive range of motion exercises for quadriplegia help treat spasticity

Remember that your therapist or caregiver should be helping you make these movements slowly and gently to avoid injury.

Try to hold the movements so that there is a slight stretch, but do not force anything.

Repeat these passive exercises at least 10 times.

Neck:

  • Neck Rotations: Tilt the head to one side so that your ear moves toward your shoulder and then alternate sides. Then, tilt it forward so that the patient is facing his/her feet and back, facing the ceiling.
  • No No’s: Turn the head from side to side as if signaling ‘no’; the eyes should stay level the entire time.

Fingers:

  • Fists: Curl the fingers inward towards the palm, creating a fist and extend them back so that they are straight.
  • O’s: Touch the tip of a finger to the tip of the thumb
  • Finger Splits: Separate any two adjacent fingers away from each other and then bring them back together.

Wrists:

  • Wrist Flicks: Move the hand forward so that the palm moves towards the inner arm and makes a 90° angle. Then, move the hand back in the opposite direction.

Elbows:

  • Flexes: Bend the elbow so that the hand can touch the shoulder. Then extend it so that the arm is straight.
  • Hand Flips: Hold the arm out so that it is straight and the back of the hand is facing up. With one hand, hold on to the elbow and with the other, flip the hand so that the palm faces up.

Shoulders:

  • Hand Raises: Start with the arm neutral so that your fingers are facing your feet. Keeping the arm straight, raise the hand forward and up so that your fingers face up.
  • Wing Flaps: Start with the arm straight and neutral again and move the hand outward to the side, away from the center of the body. The arm should be level with the shoulders. Then, bring them back to the starting position. When done quickly, it’ll look like you’re trying to fly.

Trunk:

  • Spine Twists: Have the patient lay down on his or her back with knees together and bent. After, tilt the knees towards one side and then the other. Make sure that the shoulders stay and don’t move.

Hip and Knees: 

All these hip and knee ROM exercises should have the patient lying down.

  • Knee Circles: Bend one knee so that the upper portion of the leg is facing up and there’s a 90° angle. Then, rotate the knee in circles. The bigger the circles, the better the hip movement.
  • Foot Claps: The legs should be straight. Pull one to the side, creating separation between the feet until there’s slight resistance. hen, bring your feet back together.
  • Knees to Chest: With one hand on the upper leg and the other on the foot, bend one knee so that it ‘s reaching towards the chest. Then, bring the foot back to the other leg and straighten the knee.

Ankles:

  • Ankle Rotations: Put one hand on the ankle to stabilize the leg and the other hand on the foot. Then move the foot in circular motions.

Toes:

  • Toe Curls: bend the toes in towards the sole and bring them back out to normal.

Here’s a video that quickly demonstrates some of the exercises so you can get a better understanding.

Remember that tons of repetition is necessary to develop muscle memory.

Build Your Muscle Memory with Passive Range of Motion Exercises

Have you ever heard of muscle memory?

Essentially, it’s when your muscles can almost effortlessly perform movements due to prior repetition, even after a period of inactivity.

Passive range of motion exercises not only help quadriplegics use their paralyzed joints; they also develop muscle memory.

When you have spinal cord injury, the connections between your brain and muscles get disrupted.

You need to reteach your muscles how to move again through lots of repetition, and these exercises can help!

Mentality and Passive Range of Motion Exercises for Quadriplegics

spinal cord injury patients with quadriplegia can still exercise with passive range of motion.

If you think that range of motion exercises won’t do anything, we strongly urge you to change your mentality.

Rather than focusing on speed, concentrate on consistent movement and repetition.

You can’t get better without mastering the basics and setting a strong foundation.

Everybody has to start somewhere and developing range of motion will prepare your body for more intense spinal cord injury exercises in the future.