7 Things You Must Know About Mini Stroke Recovery

7 Things You Must Know About Mini Stroke Recovery

Mini stroke recovery should be taken seriously.

Because it’s a major warning sign that a full-blown stroke is coming.

If you had a mini stroke, we’ve outlined 7 things you must know about recovery, including how to reduce your risk of another stroke.

Let’s dive straight in.

1. Mini Strokes Are also Called TIAs

A transient ischemic attack, or TIA, is the formal name used to describe a mini stroke.

There are two types of stroke: hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke.

Hemorrhagic stroke is caused by a burst artery. Ischemic stroke is caused by a clogged artery (like the photo below). A TIA is very similar to an ischemic stroke.

what is a tia mini stroke

Unlike a regular ischemic stroke, however, a TIA is a temporary blockage that leads to no permanent damage.

That’s why it’s called a “mini stroke.”

However, it should still be taken very seriously.

2. Mini Stroke Symptoms Are the Same as Regular Strokes

A TIA has the same symptoms as a regular stroke.

The National Stroke Association has summarized these symptoms in the acronym FAST.

how to identify a mini stroke

Here’s how you can identify a stroke or mini stroke:

F – Face. Ask them to smile, and if half their smile droops, it might be a stroke.

A – Arms. Ask them to raise both arms and if one drifts downward, it might be a stroke.

S – Speech. Ask them to talk, and if they slur or talk gibberish, it might be a stroke.

T – Time. If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.

Although TIA symptoms usually last less than 5 minutes, it’s still a medical emergency that requires immediate medical attention.

3. Mini Stroke Recovery Time Is Short

mini stroke recovery time

After a TIA, the blood clot dissolves on its own or gets dislodged, blood flow is often quickly restored in the brain.

This is why mini stroke recovery time is often short and followed by a full recovery.

Again, just because TIA is brief and results in no permanent damage doesn’t mean it should be dismissed.

Bonus: Download our free stroke recovery tips ebook. (Link will open a pop-up that will not interrupt your reading.)

4. Beware that Mini Stroke Is a Warning for Another “Full-Blown” Stroke

mini stroke recovery warning

A mini stroke is a warning sign that another stroke could be coming.

Up to 40% of TIA patients will have another stroke after their TIA, according to the National Stroke Association.

And nearly half of these patients will have another stroke within 2 days of the mini stroke.

That’s why stroke prevention becomes critical after a mini stroke (which we will discuss soon).

5. Know Your Stroke Risk Factors

stroke risk factors

There are many factors that can increase your risk of stroke.

Some of them are out of your control, but some of them are manageable.

Inherent stroke risk factors are:

  • Prior stroke or TIA
  • History of heart attack
  • Genetic disorders like CADASIL
  • Age (risk of stroke doubles every decade past 55)
  • Gender (women are at higher risk)

Although you cannot reverse these stroke risk factors, there are other stroke risk factors that you CAN control.

6. Know What You Can Control

management for mini stroke

There are several stroke risk factors that you can work to control, such as:

  • High blood pressure
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Diabetes
  • Atherosclerosis
  • High blood pressure
  • Sedentary lifestyle

All of these risk factors increase the likelihood that another blood clot will get clogged in an artery in the brain and cause a stroke.

Reducing these risks is critical for all mini stroke survivors.

7. Take Action to Help Prevent Another Stroke

stroke recovery prevention

To help reduce your risk of recurrent stroke, you can reduce your manageable stroke risk factors.

Some things you can do are:

  • Reduce high blood pressure with medication or lifestyle changes
  • Quit smoking if you’re a smoker
  • Manage diabetes with medication and/or lifestyle changes
  • Reduce high blood cholesterol and atherosclerosis with medication and/or dietary changes
  • Eat healthy foods that promote recovery after stroke

You should talk to your primary care physician about the best way to reduce your risk of stroke because (s)he knows your medical history.

8. Focus on Prevention for Mini Stroke Treatment

aspirin helps prevent a second stroke

Treatment for mini stroke is all about prevention.

Since the risk of recurrent stroke is high, your doctor might put you on medication to reduce your risk of stroke.

Some common treatments for TIA are:

  • Blood-thinning medications like aspirin for stroke prevention
  • Cholesterol medication if you have high cholesterol
  • Surgery to remove blockages in the carotid artery if this is where the TIA formed

The goal is to prevent the chance of another blood clot clogging an artery in the brain.

9. Make Appropriate Lifestyle Changes

healthy lifestyle changes for mini stroke recovery

A TIA is a major warning that another stroke might occur.

Work with your doctor to develop a plan to reduce your risk of stroke. Medication is often helpful.

There are steps that you can take on your own, also, that can help reduce your risk of stroke.

The two biggest steps are eating better and exercising more.

Summary: Mini Stroke Recovery

Overall, mini strokes resolve themselves quickly and lead to a fully recovery.

However, they still require immediate medical attention and swift action.

Stroke prevention becomes very important since many TIAs are followed by another stroke.

Work with your doctor and medical team to assess your stroke risk factors and handle them appropriately.